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  • #9495

    Hi. I apologize in advanced if I come out a little too strong, but your poor coding practices have made me waste countless hours of work adapting the Newscast 2.0.2 theme to my needs.

    I’v been struggling with CSS3 properties in Internet Explorer 9 for days now. Yesterday, I landed on the following article looking for something completely different. When I got to the “Uneditable Template Text” section, where the author complains about the use of:

    IE=EmulateIE7

    All of a sudden, it just hit me. Could the premium template I had bought be using such a lame coding practice? “No way!”, I thought at first. I payed good money for that template, and that is not even smth I would do on a free WP template, no matter how simple.

    Then I decided to fire up my Dreamweaver, open the header.php, and there it was, on line 8, clear as day, the reason for all my trouble:

    <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=EmulateIE7" />

    Boy, was I wrong or what?! The second I removed that line, all CSS3 properties started working in IE9.

    Now, again, as politely as I can, given the circumstances: what where you thinking? As Andrew Tetlaw puts it, quite eloquently, in his post:

    Quote:
    If you’re a theme maker and you’re unable to make your CSS work in IE unless it emulates IE7, you need to go back to the drawing board. Seriously bad form.

    I should be asking you for a full refund and bill you for the hours I wasted figuring this out, but I won’t. An explanation, however, would be nice. Oh, it would also be nice if you could read that article. It might come in handy if you want to keep your customers happy.

    BTW: I found several deprecated WP functions in this template as well. Pretty serious stuff for a premium theme, if you ask me.

    #64892

    Hey,

    the theme was released around 2 years ago and of course the code isn’t modern compared to newer themes. The IE7 emulation is required because of some javascript functions. I can understand that it’s frustrating if you discover some limitations of the older code/framework but it’s simply impossible to incorporate all new features in all themes Kriesi every released. The theme itself works flawlessly with WP3.3 and there’s no need to replace the deprecated functions yet. As soon as we encounter problems Kriesi will fix them and release an update.

    #64893

    Hi,

    Thanks for getting back to me: I appreciate it. I understand your point of view, but I have to say I am not at all convinced, and for many reasons:

    Quote:
    the theme was released around 2 years ago and of course the code isn’t modern compared to newer themes.

    IE 8 was officially released before this theme was, in March 2009. It was advertised as being “cross-browser compatible” , and I IE7 emulation pretty much confirms it wasn’t at the time (otherwise, it would have supported IE8 as well).

    [

    Quote:
    The IE7 emulation is required because of some javascript functions.

    You could have called the emulation dynamically based on a browser check, There are many free browser detection scripts both in PHP and JS that are incredibly easy to work with. I’m sorry, but this is a major oversight, to say the least.

    As for the deprecated WP functions, you stated that:

    Quote:
    it’s simply impossible to incorporate all new features in all themes Kriesi every released.

    I don’t see why it would be impossible, This is, after all, a premium (paying) theme. If even several free themes, such as Graphene, Twenty Eleven, etc. release updates regularly as WP evolves, so should premium themes. A theme that does not get updated or that has less features than a free one can barely be called “Premium” , I believe.

    Not to mention, this theme is still being supported and it was updated a couple of weeks ago from 2.0.2 to 2.0.3, so I don’t see a real reason not to update the code.

    Perhaps I am asking too much from premium developers, but at the same time, premium developers do ask for more “compensation” for their work than non-premium ones, so fair is fair, if you ask me.

    P.S.: I should have clarified in my first post that I’m not Paula Arturo, but her developer, Francisco de Azevedo (Aka, Marventus).

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